Founder on BBC 2 with Victoria Derbyshire - BME Youth Offenders

Founder Nathaniel Peat was interviewed by Victoria Derbyshire on BBC2 surrounding the new guidelines to judges.

The social and ethnic backgrounds of young offenders will now be taken into account to “avoid criminalising BME children unnecessarily”, according to sentencing guidelines for judges and magistrates published.

Among mitigating factors to be considered when punishing those between the ages of 10 and 17 are whether they have had “unstable upbringings”, experienced criminal behaviour within their family or were exposed to pornography. 

The regulations, circulated by the Sentencing Council, give greater priority to the defendant’s social circumstances, including any social deprivation or abuse. They are aimed at ensuring uniform treatment in youth courts across the country. 

“The approach to sentencing should be individualistic and focused on the child or young person, as opposed to offence focused …” the guidelines’ introductory remarks state. 

Nathaniel Peat spoke to the guidelines as being a step in the right direction, considering the disproportionate amount of BME offenders currently serving custodial sentences. 

 

 

International Safeguarding Conference

The EDUCATION Minister of Jamaica Ruel Reid and our Founder Nathaniel Peat, will be among the speakers confirmed for the second staging of the International Safeguarding Children Conference, scheduled for May 5 and 6 in Kingston, Jamaica.

The education minister will give the main address at the conference on May 5, at Mona Visitors’ Lodge, University of the West Indies, Mona. The minister and Peat join British High Commissioner David Fitton and local and overseas-based specialists in child welfare and youth services who have been confirmed for the conference, which is being held under the theme Safeguarding, Education, Training and Development.

Dubbed “The Quality of Life Conference with a Difference”, the conference is organised by the UK-based social work company One Step Forward Consultancy in collaboration with the Victoria Climbie Foundation (UK) and the British High Commission.

For more information click here

European Parlimentarian's Peace Initiative

The Safety Box Founder Nathaniel Peat and Director of Violence Prevention Jason Featherstone to attend Violent Religious Extremism Meeting - European Parliamentarians Peace Initiatve.

Houses of Parliament, Westminster. 

How is Europe to Deal With Violent Religious Extremism?

 

European Parliamentarian’s Peace Initiative

 

Dr. Thomas Walsh, UPF International President

 

Kindly Hosted by Mr. Virendra Sharma MP, UK - UPF Patron

 

Speakers Include: Rt. Hon. Tom Brake MP

Mr. Robert Cutajar MP (Malta)

Lord Ahmed of Rotherham

Prof. Mimoza Hafizi MP (Albania)

Baroness Meral Hussein-Ece Of Highbury OBE (Invited)

Dr. Afzal Ashraf: Consultant Fellow, Royal United Services Institute  

 

Dawn Mells - Head of Citizenship and PSHE

The safety box program was delivered through a 10 week summer term tailored program, working with previously identified at risk pupils from across the whole range of key stage 3. As head of Citizenship and PSHE within the school I found the classes to be extremely beneficial to the pupils involved in many different ways. Pupils began to show respect for one another and encouraged each other to be positive. Aspirations were revealed and pupils supported one another to try and work out how to achieve these ambitions. This was something I clearly saw continuing throughout school and within lessons outside of the program. Although the pupils took sometime to demonstrate this positivity I believe they gained insight and support that they will be able to take forward with them and to help them address any issues that may have previously been holding them back and leading towards negative behaviour.

A number of pupils responded particularly well to the program and have already taken personal steps to demonstrate a change in their behaviour and how they see themselves and what they can achieve. One since joined the local air cadets, this has had a positive impact on his discipline and his learning. Other pupils simply saw that they could break out of the cycle of negativity that was leading them to poor behaviour and therefore not embracing their education. I would strongly recommend The Safety Box program to any school. It is highly beneficial to all pupils especially those that need further guidance and those that need to be given a chance to make a change.

Mr E Connolly – Former Headmaster St Josephs College, Beulah Hill London SE19 3HL Gaurdian Newspape

Interview Transcript.

Mr E Connolly: - “The main reason why we invited The Safety Box into the school is not only because they have a reputation for themselves, but that we feel they can emphasise with the children in our school and in within the community. We also feel that the members who deliver the program are respected by the boys, and after 1 or 2 sessions with the team, we found that the boys themselves would go out and talk about their experiences and it was almost like a cascade effect, that they were respected; and they respected the people they were talking to and therefore they would agree with their ideas and pass it on to other students.”

Harron Siddique: - “So is it something you would recommend for another school?”

Mr E Connolly: - “I think this is an excellent idea for all schools, not necessarily those schools you would think of areas within inner London but outside of London as well. I think these people actually could explain to others some of the difficulties that students face within their lives and often it’s by knowledge of this we understand the situation that these students are in. So I think this should be rolled out not just within inner City areas but throughout the country.”

 

Haroon Siddique: - “Some of what they say is pretty shocking one of the guys was an x gang member talking about his experience in prison, do you think it’s important that young men are alerted to this information?”

 

Mr E Connolly: - “I think the greatest example that this group give is that they do not sensationalise these activities that they were in the past. They actually say to the children, “this is where I have been and this is the journey I have taken to where I am now, and it gives the child the reality that I have got somebody in front of me that actually knows how I feel sometimes, that has been in a area where there are difficulties, that has been in a area where to join a gang is part of the culture of the area where you survive, and it shows them how you can break away from that and how you can seek advice from those people that can put you on a different path. So I don’t think it is shocking at all and I think we under estimate what the children themselves have experienced in their own lives.”